Install/upgrade

For common Un*x operating systems (including macOS), all you need to do is run:

curl -sSL https://get.haskellstack.org/ | sh

or:

wget -qO- https://get.haskellstack.org/ | sh

Distribution packages are available for Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, Arch Linux and FreeBSD. Binaries for other operating systems are listed below, and available on the GitHub release page. For the future, we are open to supporting more OSes (to request one, please submit an issue).

Binary packages are signed with this signing key.

If you are writing a script that needs to download the latest binary, you can use URLs like https://get.haskellstack.org/stable/<PLATFORM>.<EXTENSION> (e.g. //get.haskellstack.org/stable/linux-x86_64.tar.gz) that always point to the latest stable release.

Windows

We recommend installing to the default location with these installers, as that will make stack install and stack upgrade work correctly out of the box.

If in doubt: you should prefer the 64-bit installer.

You may see a "Windows Defender SmartScreen prevented an unrecognized app from starting" warning when you try to run the installer. If so, click on More info, and then click on the Run anyway button that appears.

Manual download

  • Download the latest release:

  • Unpack the archive and place stack.exe somewhere on your %PATH% (see Path section below) and you can then run stack on the command line.

  • Now you can run stack from the terminal.

macOS

We generally test on the current version of macOS and do our best to keep it compatible with the three most recent major versions. Stack may also work on older versions (YMMV).

Installer script

Run:

curl -sSL https://get.haskellstack.org/ | sh

Manual download

  • Download the latest release:
  • Extract the archive and place stack somewhere on your $PATH (see Path section below)
  • Now you can run stack from the terminal.

Using Homebrew

If you have the popular brew tool installed, you can just do:

brew install stack
  • The Homebrew formula and bottles are unofficial and lag slightly behind new Stack releases, but tend to be updated within a day or two.
  • Normally, Homebrew will install from a pre-built binary (aka "pour from a bottle"), but if brew starts trying to build everything from source (which will take hours), see their FAQ on the topic.

Notes

After installation, running stack setup might fail with configure: error: cannot run C compiled programs. in which case you should run:

xcode-select --install

If you are on OS X 10.11 ("El Capitan") and encounter either of these problems, see the linked FAQ entries:

If you are on OS X 10.12 ("Sierra") and encounter GHC panic while building, see this issue

Ubuntu

Use the generic Linux option.

There is also a Ubuntu package for Ubuntu 16.10 and up, but the distribution's Stack version lags behind, so we recommend running stack upgrade --binary-only after installing it. For older stack versions which do not support --binary-only, just stack upgrade may work too. The version in Ubuntu 16.04 is too old to upgrade successfully, and so in that case stack should be installed from a release tarball.

Debian

Use the generic Linux option.

There is also a Debian package for Stretch and up, but the distribution's Stack version lags behind, so running stack upgrade --binary-only is recommended after installing it. For older stack versions which do not support --binary-only, just stack upgrade may work too.

CentOS / Red Hat / Amazon Linux

Use the generic Linux option.

There is also an unofficial Copr repo. Note that this Stack version may lag behind, so we recommend running stack upgrade after installing it.

Fedora

Use the generic Linux option.

There is also an unofficial Fedora Copr repo which can be enabled with: sudo dnf copr enable petersen/stack. Note that this Stack version may lag behind, so we recommend running stack upgrade after installing it.

openSUSE / SUSE Linux Enterprise

Use the generic Linux option.

There is also an unofficial SUSE package. Note that this Stack version may lag behind, so we recommend running stack upgrade after installing it. To install it:

  1. Add the appropriate OBS repository:

    • openSUSE Tumbleweed

      all needed is in distribution

    • openSUSE Leap

      sudo zypper ar http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/devel:/languages:/haskell/openSUSE_Leap_42.1/devel:languages:haskell.repo
      
    • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12

      sudo zypper ar http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/devel:/languages:/haskell/SLE_12/devel:languages:haskell.repo
      
  2. Install:

    sudo zypper in stack
    

Arch Linux

There is an official package in the Arch community repository. So you can install it by simply doing:

sudo pacman -S stack

Note that this version may slightly lag behind, but it should be updated within the day. The package is also always rebuilt and updated when one of its dependencies gets an update.

In order to use stack setup with older versions of GHC or on a 32-bit system, you may need the ncurses5-compat-libs AUR package installed. If this package is not installed, Stack may not be able to install older (< 7.10.3) or 32-bit GHC versions.

If you use the ArchHaskell repository, you can also get the haskell-stack-tool package from there.

NixOS

Users who follow the nixos-unstable channel or the Nixpkgs master branch can install the latest stack release into their profile by running:

nix-env -f "<nixpkgs>" -iA stack

Alternatively, the package can be built from source as follows.

  1. Clone the git repo:

    git clone https://github.com/commercialhaskell/stack.git
    
  2. Create a shell.nix file:

    cabal2nix --shell ./. --no-check --no-haddock > shell.nix
    

    Note that the tests fail on NixOS, so disable them with --no-check. Also, haddock currently doesn't work for stack, so --no-haddock disables it.

  3. Install stack to your user profile:

    nix-env -i -f shell.nix
    

For more information on using Stack together with Nix, please see the NixOS manual section on Stack.

Linux (generic)

Installer script

Run:

curl -sSL https://get.haskellstack.org/ | sh

or:

wget -qO- https://get.haskellstack.org/ | sh

Manual download

  • Download the latest release:

  • Extract the archive and place stack somewhere on your $PATH (see Path section below)

  • Ensure you have required system dependencies installed. These include GCC, GNU make, xz, perl, libgmp, libffi, and zlib. We also recommend Git and GPG. To install these using your package manager:

    • Debian / Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install g++ gcc libc6-dev libffi-dev libgmp-dev make xz-utils zlib1g-dev git gnupg
    • Fedora / CentOS: sudo dnf install perl make automake gcc gmp-devel libffi zlib xz tar git gnupg (use yum instead of dnf on CentOS and Fedora <= 21)
      • Fedora 24: In order to use stack setup on a 32-bit system, you may need to run sudo dnf install ncurses-compat-libs. If this package is not installed, Stack may not be able to install 32-bit GHC versions. Also sudo dnf install ncurses-compat-libs if you nee
    • Arch Linux: sudo pacman -S make gcc ncurses git gnupg xz zlib gmp libffi zlib

      • In order to use stack setup with older versions of GHC or on a 32-bit system, you may need the ncurses5-compat-libs AUR package installed. If this package is not installed, Stack may not be able to install older (< 7.10.3) or 32-bit GHC versions.
        • Gentoo users, make sure to have the ncurses package with USE=tinfo (without it, stack will not be able to install GHC).
  • Now you can run stack from the terminal.

FreeBSD

(only 64-bit currently available, tested on FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE)

Installer script

Run:

curl -sSL https://get.haskellstack.org/ | sh

Manual download

  • Install required dependencies:

    pkg install devel/gmake perl5 lang/gcc misc/compat8x misc/compat9x converters/libiconv ca_root_nss
    
  • Download the latest release:

  • Extract the archive and place stack somewhere on your $PATH (see Path section below)

  • Now you can run stack from the terminal.

Path

You can install stack by copying it anywhere on your PATH environment variable. We recommend installing in the same directory where stack itself will install executables (that way stack is able to upgrade itself!). On Windows, that directory is %APPDATA%\local\bin, e.g. "c:\Users\Michael\AppData\Roaming\local\bin". For other systems, use $HOME/.local/bin.

If you don't have that directory in your PATH, you may need to update your PATH (such as by editing .bashrc).

If you're curious about the choice of these paths, see issue #153

Shell auto-completion

To get tab-completion of commands on bash, just run the following (or add it to .bashrc):

eval "$(stack --bash-completion-script stack)"

For more information and other shells, see the shell auto-completion page

Upgrade

There are essentially four different approaches to upgrade:

  • The stack tool itself ships with an upgrade command, which download a stack binary or build it from source and install it to the default install path (e.g. ~/.local/bin or %APPDATA%\local\bin; see the Path section above). You can use stack upgrade to get the latest official release, and stack upgrade --git to install from Git and live on the bleeding edge. Make sure the default install directory is on your PATH and takes precedence over the system installed stack, or copy stack from that directory to the system location afterward. For more information, see this discussion.

  • If you're using a package manager and are happy with sticking with the officially released binaries from the distribution (which may the lag behind latest version of Stack significantly), simply follow your normal package manager strategies for upgrading (e.g. apt-get update && apt-get upgrade).

  • The get.haskellstack.org script supports the -f argument to over-write the current stack executable. For example:

    curl -sSL https://get.haskellstack.org/ | sh -s - -f

or:

  wget -qO- https://get.haskellstack.org/ | sh -s - -f
  • Manually follow the steps above to download the newest binaries from the release page and replace the old binary.